Criminal Defense/ Forfeiture

If you are facing criminal charges in the state of Arizona, or if you are involved in a forfeiture case, you need a trustworthy attorney on your side. Alane Ortega has been practicing law in Arizona for eight years, and she can help you fight for your rights.

About Criminal Charges in Arizona

Criminal charges in Arizona fall into one of two categories: Misdemeanors and felonies.

Misdemeanors

Misdemeanors in Arizona are divided into three classes. Class 1 misdemeanors are the most severe crimes in this category, while Class 3 misdemeanors are the least severe crimes. The possible consequences for each of these classes vary based on the severity.

  • Class 3 misdemeanor convictions are punishable by a fine of up to $500 and up to 30 days in jail.
  • Class 2 misdemeanor convictions are punishable by a fine of up to $750 and up to four months in jail.
  • Class 1 misdemeanor convictions are punishable by a fine of up to $1000 and up to six months in jail.

Felonies

Felonies in Arizona are divided into six classes based on their severity. While Class 1 felonies are the most serious, Class 6 felonies are the least serious in this category. Possible consequences of felony convictions are as follows.

  • Class 6 felony convictions are punishable by up to two years in prison.
  • Class 5 felony convictions are punishable by up to two and a half years in prison.
  • Class 4 felony convictions are punishable by up to three years and nine months in prison.
  • Class 3 felony convictions are punishable by up to eight years and nine months in prison.
  • Class 2 felony convictions are punishable by up to 12.5 years in prison.
  • Class 1 felony convictions are punishable by 16 years to life in prison.

Arizona Forfeiture Law

Forfeiture cases occur when the government seizes property from an individual or organization under the assumption that the property was acquired through criminal activity or was going to be used for criminal purposes.

Before property is seized, the individual or organization will receive notice that a seizure is planned. At this point, the owner of the property has a limited amount of time to take action. If the property has already been taken by the government, the owner can request a hearing. The property owner may also choose to file a petition for remission.

Contact Us

If you are facing criminal charges or a forfeiture case, contact the office of Alane Ortega today.

Ratings and Reviews